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BINARY OPTIONS XPOSED AUTOTRADER CLASSICS

This technology did not exist in After the fire, we can see blue emergency vehicle lights shining on the wall of the room. In , all emergency vehicles in the US used red lights. Blue lights weren't adopted until the late s. When Jake is in Kentucky asking directions at a gas station, the camera pans past a soda machine that is clearly of modern design.

When Jake is being interrogated by the Secret Service, the camera pans past a ball valve at the beginning of the scene. Ball valves were not commercially available until John Clayton's Sadie's Husband , has a red Chrysler with smoke tinted windows. Blue and green spray on tint was popular after WWII.

But dark smoke tint film wasn't invented until Most cars in the show have built-it seat belts. In there were no laws forcing car manufacturers to install them and, even though they did exist, they had to be custom made and most drivers did not like them. It was not until the late 's that seat belts became mandatory. When being chased from the JFK gathering after the speech, Franco's character runs down a hall and enters a hallway with pipes.

Before he leaves the hallway, a modern doorway is visible with sliding glass doors and the motion detector above the doors. During the interrogation, an eye wash station is also visible. None of these existed in When Jake goes to use the telephone booth to call his father, there are no overhead wires visible for either telephone or electrical wires. Underground electrical and telephone were not in use in When Harry Dunning tells the story of how his family is murdered, he's standing in front of a chalkboard but in Jake's flashback, Dunning is standing in front of a window.

Yet later, Jake has a permanent Maine plate on both the front and rear of his car. He left Maine before he could have gotten the permanent plates. Al even tells him that he can still answer to Jake. When Jake first arrives in Dallas and is driving through Dealey Plaza, he looks up at the 6th floor window and you can see Reunion Tower behind him. This is supposed to be Reunion Tower was built in You can clearly see the base of the reunion tower while Jake is driving through Dallas.

It is after you see the Dallas skyline but before he reaches the book depository. Reunion tower was not built until This sign was a dominant feature of the building. When Jake walks to the phone booth to make a call, the booth is incorrectly located at the very edge of the side walk at the street instead of where it should be, behind the side walk. At a Mexican restaurant In Dallas, Jake orders and is served a margarita. Liquor by the drink was not legal in Texas until When Jake crosses over in Bangor, on October 21, , the day is sunny and appears to be mild in temperature.

You can most definitely tell that a lot of research and thought went into this novel. The descriptions are vivid and when I say you are really transported back to the 60's I mean it. You will feel it. This is another of King's books that I could see as a film, too.

If you are wanting to try a Stephen King book, but don't know if you will like all the horror, read this! It is not like that at all. View all 72 comments. Oct 24, Merphy Napier rated it liked it Shelves: alternate-history , three-stars , adult. Boy oh boy do I have mixed feelings on this book. He could have written a book of cliches but instead he said "your cliches are wrong" and I loved it. I really felt like I was in this time period with these people. And I loved it.

I mean, how often do you read a book where the ending is, you lose. They always win. Sure, someone may die, they may lose in one area but win in the other etc, but they always come out on top in some way. In this book, Jake loses in every way. He spent years of his life, broke his body, and lost his mind, all for this cause of changing time. But it turns out time can't be changed.

His mission couldn't be done without ruining everything. He failed. I don't know, I think that's pretty brilliant and I loved it. I don't mind a very slow book, I loved the first pages which were far from fast paced. But the plot just hit pause for pages so we could focus on a romance, and then once it picked back up, it still took a while to get interesting again should go without saying but this is obvs my opinion, I know not everyone will feel this way.

It was painfully slow a times, then really rushed other times. He would spend soooo much time describing arbitrary things, then rush through stuff that's actually interesting. I loved the way it ended, but why so rushed?! We had pages of build up, and a hundred pages for the end. It was such a slow build up, and when we got to the thing I was reading the book for, it was so rushed! I would have really loved less of reenacting an entire school play and other pointless things and more from the ending.

Do you know how many times King either said "the past is obdurate" or "the past harmonizes with itself'? I do, because I got the e book just so I could do a mass search. The answer is 63 times. Sixty three times in one book! To say two phrases that are saying the same thing!!

The repetitiveness felt intentional, but it was still over the top. And that's not just these phrases, several things were repetitive, but these two felt like they were on every page. That's all. I don't know, it was an incredibly cool concept and some things were so well written, while in other ways, I really feel like the execution missed the mark. Very mixed feelings.

View all 16 comments. Seriously, read this! Shelves: favorites , read-reviewed , hand-me-some-tissues , i-e-i-will-always-love-you , cried-my-eyes-out , didn-t-see-that-coming , 6-stars , exceeded-my-expectations. I'm so upset that it's over You got me at the ending there, Stephen. You really, truly got me. What can I possibly say about this wonderful, beautiful book?

That it's wonderful and beautiful? That's no where near enough praise. This book made it up to my top 3 favorites list by King placing at 3 and is probably my favorite book of if not tied with Shutter Island. Reading this book, I was so worried about what the ending would be because, let's be honest here, we know King isn't the best at handling endings Exhibit A: Under the Dome , and I had a really strong feeling I knew what the ending would be, but that ending was just absolutely amazing It left everything wrapped up nicely, and was one of his better endings, if not his best or at least my favorite, even though it's not wrapped up with a pretty bow.

The last chapter made me grin ear to ear, but then it left me feeling sad beyond words can describe. To be honest, after I turned the last page or better yet, clicked, since I own a Kindle , I just sat there and bawled my eyes out, to the point where my husband got worried about me. It was that sad. The characters in this book couldn't be better, and I really, truly mean that.

I loved every single character with the exception of Lee Harvey Oswald Poor Marina Their love for each other was undeniable and irrevocable, and just so darn beautiful. Who would have thought that the Stephen King we all know and love at least I know and love him could write a beautiful and touching romance alongside a thriller. That was a great shock, and I hope he incorporates this skill of weaving a good relationship into a lot more of his books to come. Being a huge King fan, I couldn't wait for this book to come out.

But, in all fairness, I didn't expect to love it. I thought it would be average, maybe even "just okay" , but let me tell you I really, really loved this book. And if you aren't a King fan, please pretty please don't let that stop you from reading this book. This book has absolutely no scary parts, for those of you who abstain from reading Stephen King's books because they are classified as horror, and, like I mentioned earlier on in this review, I actually cried at the end of the book the first time that I've ever cried while reading a King novel.

So, please, even if you don't like Stephen King, read this! It's an absolutely beautiful book, and one I wish I can read for the first time all over again. And if you're still not convinced to read this, would it help if I told you that there's And if you're listening to the audiobook, maybe two boxes.

For those wondering, these are my top 3 favorite King books: 1: It 2: The Shining 3: this may shock some people I'll love your face no matter what is looks like. Home is where you dance with others, and dancing is life. Don't we all secretly know this?

It's a perfectly balanced mechanism of shouts and echoes pretending to be wheels and cogs, a dreamclock chiming beneath a mystery-glass we call life. Behind it? Below it and around it? Chaos, storms. Men with hammers, men with knives, men with guns. Women who twist what they cannot dominate and belittle what they cannot understand.

A universe of horror and loss surrounding a single lighted stage where mortals dance in defiance of the dark. To listen to Stephen King read an excerpt from Dr. Sleep , click here. PPS: Dr. Sleep is about Danny Torrance you know, from The Shining as an adult, and how he uses his psychic powers to help patients on death row at the hospital where he works, until a gang of vampires kidnap him Or something like that View all 52 comments.

Nov 09, Elyse Walters rated it it was amazing Shelves: favorite , fiction , sci-fi-fantasy , historical-fiction. There's two main story lines: 1 The Romance story with wonderful well developed characters 2 Stop A major event in U. History its all well plotted throughout the book Both mixed together in some very intelligent--satisfying ways. Stephen King knows how to blend the supernatural with history better than your average author.

I'm often not a fan of time travel fiction reading but Stephen King improves this type of storytelling by adding themes, choices, and consequences in his story. At some point in your reading View all 71 comments. Real spoilers are inside "spoiler" tags. Things that tell a little about the content that I would have appreciated hearing before committing to this behemoth are not. You've been warned. This is my first Stephen King read.

I'm not a horror fan, but I love a good alternate history, and I figured that a story of a man who goes back in time to stop Kennedy's assassination could be one of those. It isn't. Not the biggest hurdle, because this could still have been an enjoyable read if it had been abou Real spoilers are inside "spoiler" tags. Not the biggest hurdle, because this could still have been an enjoyable read if it had been about a man who travels back to live in a different time and gives insightful commentary on the similarities and differences between these cultures.

This book wasn't that, either. It was exactly what I had naively been trying not to read: a horror. Your basic stabby horror, with a slight twist. In this book, the immutability of the past, its obduracy to cling to what has already been, is the thing with teeth. I know that doesn't sound traditionally horrific, but its manifestation is that when the main character is trying to do something that would result in immediately changing the outcome of a big event--such as an event in which someone originally got killed--this aspect of the past intervenes repeatedly and violently to keep him from doing it.

Or all of those, and others. So the "dramatic" parts of the story involve our hero attempting to get to his destination and, for example, having to stop for green lights while traffic barrels through in the other direction, then having to go deal with his overwhelming diarrhea, then having to talk some completely random guy out of shooting him for a nonsense reason.

Then he has to deal with a topiary. A major part of the climax of the novel involves him trying to run up six flights of stairs having just broken a few ribs in a car crash, while also being a few weeks out of a coma. There's a killing of a family by sledgehammer-wielding maniac described in detail multiple times in the first pages. Later on, a woman gets her cheek ripped open by a knife-wielding maniac.

Multiple people kill themselves in front of our hero by slitting their throats. The structure of the novel is as follows: guy finds out he can easily go back in time to , to the same minute of the same day each time he goes. He becomes part of his friend's plot to keep Kennedy from being killed. Except the guy doesn't quite believe this whole time travel thing, so he goes back to , spends about 2 months hanging out and making observations about what various companies' slogans are always reproduced in all caps, so that it feels like they're being yelled from the page , stops a violent crime from happening close to home, and zips back to to confirm that, yes, he did change the past.

He returns to , re-stops that crime, and then spends the better part of five years waiting for Kennedy's assassination attempt. That's the middle of the book: him sitting around in the early s, in a holding pattern, scoping out downtown Dallas and following Lee Harvey Oswald from a distance so he can convince himself that he really doesn't like this guy.

It takes at least pages for to arrive. The decision of what to do to Oswald is presented as simple and binary, in a way that bugged me throughout the book. If our hero finds out that Oswald is the lone person behind the assassination, then the only course of action considered is for our guy to kill him.

There's some momentary advance remorse about that, but not much, because Oswald is known to have killed Kennedy in the real timeline. The thing I still don't get is, in the real timeline, Oswald died as a direct result of having been arrested for Kennedy's murder. Which means that a person who simply kept Oswald from being present on the parade route that day by any means necessary, gory ones included--slit the guy's arm open with a knife, for example would save both Kennedy's life and Oswald's.

No murder necessary. King doesn't even give this idea lip service--killing is presented as the only possible plan in order to get the assassination stopped. Back to our hero. After he changes history, view spoiler [he finds out that human events are so important that if they get changed as significantly has he has altered them, the entire earth reacts. Human events cause geological events. By stopping Kennedy's assassination, he initiates massive earthquakes, leading to lots of deaths and eventually to nuclear meltdowns years later.

All of which means that instead of King doing the thing that people tend to find intriguing when reading alternate histories--giving his answer to "what really would have happened with Vietnam and Civil Rights and all that if Kennedy hadn't been shot? So you spend pages wondering what King thinks this history would have looked like with more Kennedy in it, and King's writing itself is very workmanlike.

He is rarely poetic or descriptive in ways that give any deeper meaning or even paint a vivid picture. This would be fine or something on the yawn-inducing side of fine if this were a fast, plot-driven book, but it's not. The engine of the book is the main character's time travel journey back from to and the years immediately following, but nothing that he ever says makes this feel like reality.

The narrator is supposed to be 35 in , which places him in my own age cohort--but I think even someone 10 or 20 years older than I am, given the time-travel option, would have a lot of strong visceral reactions to the way the world was back then.

King has him comment on the fact that root beer tastes "fuller" from a soda fountain than it does in the present--but frankly, that doesn't give me much to go on, and he uses that same descriptor every time he references the root beer an awful lot without adding to the picture. And that's it: he does nothing else to show how the experience of drinking at a soda fountain would be different from the experience that someone born in the late s would be used to at a diner in the 21st century.

It's like this with so many things: either our hero doesn't seem to notice all the little differences in daily life, or he treats these with a nostalgia borrowed from the author. The representation of his age is wrong on other levels, too--the guy says he had never used a rotary phone before traveling to , even though many people from older generations like my grandparents and anyone else who could remember the Depression held on to their rotary phones until almost the s; and yet this same guy has a thorough and in-depth understanding of how to mess with records and record players to slow down playback.

His first time in , our hero buys what is apparently a cool s car and instantly falls in love with driving it, to the extent that he detests his Toyota Corolla with a passion when he gets back to The shift in his loyalties is instantaneous and unequivocal--no disorientation about the lack of seat belts or other now-familiar features in an older car, just a seamless love for all things vintage that feels too uncomplicated to be on-target.

The cigarette smoke is another of this kind of example: our hero comments that smoke and smokers are everywhere, but then just seems able to ignore it. It rings false that a non-smoker who finds himself in a place where every restaurant and bank has people smoking in it, and where every hotel room, used car, and cab reeks of cigarettes, wouldn't have a lot more adjusting to do than just the casual shrug that the guy gives when he mentions it.

It may sound weird that, given a book that's far too long, I'd be complaining about a lack of words, but it's more that the things King chooses to say often don't contribute to the storytelling or plotting or character development or setting and instead are meaningless, repetitive, and make the lack of significant detail all the more conspicuous by its absence.

While I was reading this book, my commuting audiobook was TC Boyle's Drop City, which is set in a hippie commune in The contrast between how Boyle gives a sense of and how King gives a sense of is vertiginous. Now for the -isms. After about pages of , it struck me that King was painting an idealistic, whitewashed picture of what was a turbulent and violent time with regard to civil rights.

And right then, our hero said exactly the same thing in the narrative: "in case this seems like an overly happy picture, let me tell you about this 'colored' restroom I saw outdoors in North Carolina. He goes on to describe a rest stop in which the regular bathroom is labeled for use by whites only and the signs to the 'colored' restroom lead to something awful.

Completely reasonable and valid point made right there Anytime else in the book when he wants to talk about Civil Rights or unequal treatment or any of that, he references the bathroom in North Carolina. It doesn't seem to matter that the character drives from Florida to Texas across all of the most virulently racist states in the South during a time when race-related violence was peaking, then lives in Texas for another few years.

In all that time, he runs across a white man who says racist things and consequently decides he doesn't like the guy This character is walking around in the South living in segregated neighborhoods, eating at segregated lunch counters at which he always comments that the food is both good and cheap , drinking from segregated water fountains, riding buses where he gets to sit down when others have to stand in back because of their difference in skin color--and barely notices all of the casual racism entrenched in this world.

The fact that not only doesn't he notice this around him, but also that he has to reach way back to that one restroom in North Carolina whenever he needs to talk about discrimination, comes across as casually racist. Anti-Semitism: there are four characters in the book who are described explicitly as Jewish. One of them is Jack Ruby, a real person who apparently owned a strip club King makes sure to point out and who was the guy who shot Oswald in the real timeline after he was in custody.

The other three are fictional, all bookies. They run pawn shops and have Mob ties and all make their money explicitly from the suffering of others. I could mention the two female family members we are introduced to as well, but they aren't characters--the narrative states explicitly at one point that they are interchangeable. They also work in the family money businesses. I'd like to thank Stephen King personally for perpetuating stereotypes that just need to freaking die already. While we're at it, sexism: our hero is a guy who starts dating a woman in about , and he also spends a number of years teaching high school don't get me started on that--an English teacher from travels back 50 years and starts teaching adolescents seamlessly, without having any trouble adjusting to the loss of the most recent five decades of writing to teach from?

The loss of recognized diversity in curricula? How limited a teacher is he? He comments that they're expected to wear girdles sometimes, but he compares that to guys having to wear condoms and says that guys have it worse.

Otherwise, he conveys no sense in the least that girls or women might have an easier time of things in than they do in I could say more about my dislike of this book. I could mention my frustration with the way that King writes as though he knows nothing about what the Butterfly Effect actually references for the first pages--so that when he reveals that he mostly gets it, it's too little, too late. I could rant about many other aspects of the novel. Instead, I'll end by saying that there are books out there that accomplish what King is trying to do, using well-chosen words and fewer of them , thoughtful plots, and skilled character development.

For a time-travel study in contrasts, try Kindred , by Octavia Butler. For an experience of recent history that feels immersive and real , complete with sex, drugs, and rock'n'roll , try Drop City , by TC Boyle. View all 58 comments. Nov 19, David Putnam rated it really liked it. This one should've been five stars for me. I think what happened was that I loved the concept when I read about the book and had envisioned something more.

The story King wanted to write was all there and I truly enjoyed it. As always with King this is a great study in character and the evolution of the character. In this case using time as an added conflict that applies pressure on the character. King doesn't mess around with elaborate explanations on how or why the time travel works. It's just This one should've been five stars for me. It's just a simple closet in the diner that the character steps into and we're off and running.

I think this works mostly because we trust King so implicitly and that if he says it true it's true. For me a good book caused me to think about the story even when I was not reading. In this case, while still into the book, I researched the actual incident, the assassination, to see how far King veered historically.

I found the topic so interesting I fell down the rabbit doing too much historical reading. I like the book a great deal and recommend it. View all 20 comments. We were invited in. Therefore, because the dark surrounds us, let us turn our faces to the light. Let us endure hardship to be grateful for plenty. We have been given pain to be astounded by joy.

We have been given life to deny death. We did not ask for this room or this music. But because we are here, let us dance. But first, he must create a life for himself in the years leading up to the assassination as he has some research to do. In doing so, he stumbles upon the town of Jodie and a beautiful librarian named Sadie Dunhill. Let me preface this review by saying When I first read this book it blew me away, and on my reread, it had the exact same effect.

I would go so far as to say that this is one of the best books I've ever read. Usually I can find faults within all of King's works, but I'm sitting here trying to think of something I didn't like about this book and I've got nothing. On my first read I sometimes felt a bit bored by the JFK plot, but I think that was because I was so impatient to get back to Jake's life and relationship with Sadie. Now on my reread, I already knew what was coming - the same urgency wasn't there - so I was able to appreciate that storyline a bit more and it's actually really piqued an interest in learning more about this moment in American history.

King's writing is beautiful in this book. He evokes such a range of emotions in these pages, one minute I was laughing, the next I was crying. He makes me nostalgic for a time period and a country I didn't even live in! A root beer never ever appealed to me until I read this book. His, or rather Jake's, reflections on life just really resonated with me, life CAN turn on a dime and this book is a constant reminder to just enjoy what you have when you have it - because who knows what is around the corner?

I fell in love with Sadie as Jake did. Sadie is brave, headstrong, resilient, and given her past, her outlook on life is inspiring. As for Jake, some of the decisions he makes without giving away any spoilers proves that he is simply a good man. To take on such an arduous task, spanning years of your life, is admirable. And with these two amazing characters, King writes his greatest love story.

It is beautiful and heartfelt and REAL. It shook me to my core. If anyone ever tries to tell you that King can only write horror, slam this book in their face! Although that's not to say that there aren't moments of horror Credit must also be given to the ridiculous amount of research that must have gone into this book.

The attention to detail is staggering - I personally cannot say how much of it is accurate as I don't know much about the JFK assassination - but I'm guessing King left no stone unturned. I'm actually trying to convince my mum to read it as I think she'd love it, but she remains stubborn - I WILL break her!! On a final note, I'm intrigued as to what King's initial ending was - he says in the afternotes that Joe came up with a better ending than the one he had planned.

I wonder if it would have left me so dehydrated Does that make sense? It does to me. Truly incredible. View all 18 comments. How did you do that? And is that a laptop melted onto a lawn mower? See there was this lightning strike and now I can use my time mower to visit the past and ….

Wait a second. Oh, shit! What year are you from? My name is George Amberson. You too? Oh, man. That old chestnut? But are you sure you should be changing stuff in the past? That seems really dangerous and could cause all kinds of paradoxes. Or worse yet, accidentally become your own grandfather. We did a few trial runs, and everything seemed OK. In fact, how do you time travel?

I have a friend named Al who found a kind of portal in time. We call it the rabbit hole. Every time you go through it, you wind up at the same day in our home town in Al went through the rabbit hole over and over for years and discovered that no matter how long you stay, when you go back through the portal, only two minutes have elapsed since you left. The person he saved was alive, but if he goes back through the portal to the past again, then everything resets to the original timeline and that person would die, unless Al saved them again, right?

And you could go back to the past wearing that hat which resets everything, but when you went to the store you bought it from, the same hat would still be on your head and on the shelf at the same time! Jake, are you sure about this? He worked it all out. Al is a baby boomer, right?

A physicist? A historian? He owns the local diner. He came through and lived here several years while he watched Oswald. So he went back to and told me about the rabbit hole. I just realized that you had to live here for five years waiting for this moment. Damn, five years in the past must have sucked, Jake.

You know, because of the reset. I had to spend some time in a really nasty town in Maine called Derry. It was a very ugly place in They had some child murders. I started teaching again and built up a whole life for myself as George Amberson. I really like it here in the past now. But they have really good root beer in this time. And stuff is really cheap!

I can buy a new car for peanuts. Speaking of which, how did you make money? Just teaching? Like I made a pretty penny betting on the Dallas Texans to beat Houston the other night. It was very cool to bet on the Cowboys before they were even the Cowboys.

The NFL started the Cowboys in Dallas just to screw with him, and he eventually had to move the team to Kansas City and change their name to the Chiefs. The Cowboys were always the Cowboys. Are you sure about that, Kemper? Jesus, you are scaring the shit out of me. I hope to hell you know a lot more about the JFK assassination than you do about pro football.

Did you at least bring some history books with you? You said that Al spent years getting ready for this? And each time hop only takes you two minutes, right? I really wish you would have thought this through more than just doing a couple of test runs. You should have done that like twenty times. It would have taken you just forty minutes, right?

You see, for one thing, the time we spent in the past is still elapsed time. The deeper you get into, the more you have to lose. You see, the past does not want to be changed. If you try to revise something, it fights back. When we did our trial runs, it threw everything it could at us from car trouble to illness, and the bigger the event, the harder it tries to stop you.

And this seems like a good idea, Jake? I did this with the best of intentions. I mean, you seem like a nice guy. Good luck you poor bastard. This was a big story in Dallas at the time and both teams did tons of promotions and advertising so it doesn't seem possible that Jake was somehow unaware of the existence of the Cowboys.

But the old Negro Leagues baseball team that had players like Satchel Paige was called the Monarchs, and you can still purchase Monarchs merchandise in KC today. Are they mistakes or is King just being cute? And that makes me nuts. When I heard the concept of this book, I worried that King was succumbing to a bad case of baby boomer JFKitis, and the early parts of the book seem to have confirmed this. I was greatly relieved that by the end of this book, King seemed to have set aside the rose colored JFK glasses and made that oddity about the objects part of a paradox instead of just a plot contrivance.

A Masterpiece! Awesome story!! Stephen blows my mind. His prose is so easy to follow and he is so clear what he is getting across to me, the reader. It knows how to set up a character. There are a lot of bells and whistles in this story and its draw is Lee Oswald and the shooting of JFK. Yet, this story is really a love story. It's a beautiful relationship the A Masterpiece! It's a beautiful relationship the two have and the love story holds the whole book together, in my opinion.

Jake goes back in time to stop the assassination of JFK. He lives in and he finds a strange time-hole that goes to and he has to live life in the past before he can stop Lee. He moves to the Dallas area to a little town called Jodie, TX where he substitute teaches and becomes a full time staff. The librarian is Sadie Dunhill and they quickly become friends.

Half of the story almost is their story and about the kids at school. Stephen is a master a character writing. If you want to know how to write a character, then Stephen is the master to follow. He uses that to build this community of Jodie and I was so pulled in. I almost didn't care about the rest, but it's so intricately woven together that it's all one thread. As readers, especially someone like me who didn't know a whole lot about Oswald, Stephn has done his research and he packs this books with historical facts.

He plays here and there with timing and he lets us know in the afterward, but mostly, he sticks to the facts. I am amazed how much is known about the spouse abusing messed up man. King really brings the humanity to Marina, his wife and their child and he even shows the humanity of Lee at moments with his daughter. Marina put up with a horror show. The theme of this book is 'the past harmonizes' and Stephen drives this point home to good effect. It becomes it's own harmonic in the book and it helps to bring all the stories going on together.

I'm telling you, this is a layered masterpiece from one of the most gifted writers of our time. He weaves historical fact with fiction with historical fiction with time travel with a love story for the ages. The idea of time travel is also dealt with. What happens if time is changed? What would that do to the world? Would a good intention to change the past bring about the changes we want? These are the questions explored in this book. The time travel is unique to what I've seen and I love it.

In a dinner in the town Jake lives in, there is a "rabbit hole" and this particular hole leads to Everytime you go in, it's like a reset and anything you changed before is undone and it's always the exact same time you come out in. It is a wonderful device Stephen came up with.

Jake's friend hatches this plan to save JFK and Jake is the one who has to carry it out. It's fascinating and it makes you wonder if a "rabbit hole might be possible and how interesting to make that happen. It's a lovely device used in the story and all kinds of choices happen from it. You can go back and see the changes you made and then go back and tweek it.

This is now one of my Top 5 Favorite Stephen King novels. I really think it's a masterpiece and he is at the top of his game here. I wish I had read it sooner, but I got it now. Also, I got my tome in this year, barely. It also makes me wonder how many more masterpieces Stephen has in him.

He seems to have one or more a decade. I guess 45 years of writing daily does pay off in a big way. I also have a harmonic resonance with Stephen and his work. I was born in and he published Carrie in I find that interesting.

I think my goal is to make a Stephen King year and I want to get caught up with his bibliography again. I will see if I can do a book a month or so. There are some big ones left to read so that might be asking too much. View all 27 comments. Apr 08, Gabby rated it it was amazing Shelves: 5-star-books , read-in , or-more-pages , adult , amazing-ending , forbidden-romance , classics , own , romance , has-a-movie.

We hav 4. View all 10 comments. Aug 08, Ahmad Sharabiani rated it really liked it Shelves: fiction , 21th-century , historical. Kennedy, which occurred on November 22, Epping gives an assignment to his adult students, asking them to write about a day that changed their lives. One of the students, a janitor named Harry Dunning, submits an assignment describing the night his alcoholic father murdered his mother and siblings with a hammer and injured Harry, causing him to have a permanent brain injury; the story emotionally affects Jake, and the two become friends after Harry earns his GED.

Two years later, in June , Jake stops by a local diner and speaks with the proprietor, Al, who asks Jake to meet him at his diner the next day. When Jake arrives, he is shocked to see that Al seems to have aged years since the previous day. Al explains that he is dying and that his appearance is attributable to his having time traveled and lived for years in the past.

Al's method of time travel is a time portal he discovered in his diner's pantry, which he used to transport himself to Feb 25, Felice Laverne rated it it was amazing Shelves: historical-fiction , full-review , thrillers. The premise in itself was exhilarating, and the execution was near flawless. This one was a novel that absolutely could not have been tackled by just anyone and may have fallen flat on its face if handled by a less experienced craftsman. Even characters who were fleeting left their mark, shocking me, tickling me, and provoking thought along the way.

The jargon that King used to color the various neighborhoods and scenes from Maine to Florida to Texas was deliciously realistic—he has a knack for that, and it was on full display here—and I felt that I was fully immersed in the world that he painted. This one gave me goosebumps in more than one place and food for thought in several others. And, refreshingly, King resisted painting the 50s as a happy-go-lucky time of just sock-hops and poodle skirts and gave the 60s the gritty air that it deserved.

He infused this glimpse at this time period with realistic strokes of segregation and poverty in his portrayal—truly showing us the world through King-colored glasses. From backwoods Maine lingo to deep Southern vernacular, the voices were masterfully done and the characters were all fully realized. There are biblical references and historical facts—and distortions of them that allowed for his own creative riff on the past—Gothic elements galore and grit. True, unflinching blood-and-dirt-in-your-nails grit.

This one came full circle in various parts of the novel, not just in the end in that formulaic way that we are all oh-so-familiar with, showing how all of the pieces connected hand-in-hand to tell one larger story. Quite the narrative tool for building suspense and tension. But the sheer gravity of this novel and unimpeachable hand that resonated through to the very last page overrode those small annoyances.

View all 23 comments. I had just sat down to begin this review on my laptop when the doorbell went. I wasn't expecting anyone. It was probably going to be one of those pitiful door to door salesmen trying to get me to buy a dishcloth for a fiver. They make me feel so bad. But it wasn't. I opened the door and looked at myself. It was me. I'm you. Sorry about that. Like looking in a mirror, isn't it? But worse! So I went inside. I made myself a cup of tea and one for me too.

We sat down at the table and regarded each other with frank horror. Are you a clone? I'm from the future. It's that one there — " I gestured to the fat wedge on the table between us. The one you were going to. You have to change it. How do you know what I was going to write, anyway, I haven't written it yet? Come on, the guy in this book is a lot quicker on the uptake than this.

I haven't got all day. You'd already worked up a few choice phrases, along the lines of So he goes back in time to and he's living through these years waiting to get to the assassination bit and that's where the story becomes this I-Love-The-Lates-Stroke-Early-Sixties loveletter from Stephen King to his own childhood. The boring teacher gets to meet a girl and fall in lurve, sweet sweet lurve. That's not a spoiler, it's in the blurb, sweet sweet blurb.

He gets to live in The perfect Small Town. He gets to Affect Kids' Lives. He gets to blurt out anachronistic slang and have people look at him funny! He gets to wince at casual racism! It's all good. But not for me. I wanted to get back to Oswald. I paid my damn ticket, and I wanted to see some Oswald. But for pages it may as well have. But Oswald's the one that I want.

Oooh ooh ooh. I was amazed — that was exactly what I was going to write. You can't deny it. I know you were because you did it, that's to say I did it, and I'm here now to stop myself from doing it. I got the idea of looking for a portal when I read this book. Why didn't you do something more useful than that? And I found somebody's lost cat for them.

And now you — you're the last on my list. Stephen King goes on and on and on about it. Because of that. Sorry about that, I gave myself away there. It can be confusing getting all this straight in your head when you're from the future. Got any aspirin? Anyway, your nasty review gets to be unaccountably popular on Goodreads.

I've been getting kind of middling results for months. You're only as good as your last review, you know. It's a vicious world.

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His plan is to determine, with utter certainty, that Lee Harvey Oswald Daniel Webber is the culprit, and then he will kill Oswald and return to a changed world. But cancer has wrecked Al, and he will not live to complete his mission - so he recruits Jake, who has very little to live for in Every frame is pleasing to the eye, embracing the s nostalgia with clean lines, warmth and color. And yes, it's only '60s nostalgia here - the narrative is streamlined with the portal dropping Jake in instead of , one of only a few understandable changes to the source material.

Jake's s pseudonym is James rather than George Amberson, so he can still go by Jake, and a few other storylines are consolidated for effect. He's giving it his all, or his most, or as much as James Franco ever gives anything, but his essential demeanor is so unimpressed. Franco's got resting snark face, and so in the moments that Jake is meant to be nearly overwhelmed with ardor for this new world, his new life, he comes across, at best, as slyly amused, and at worst as smug and superior.

Franco's obviously a big get from a casting standpoint - next to Chris Cooper who makes a perfect Al , he's by far the biggest name in the cast, and he's credited, however loosely, as a producer on the miniseries. But when I think about how this otherwise-ideal production would be so much better served with almost anyone else in the lead role, it's a real bummer.

Does a story that takes place nearly entirely in the early s need to be TV-MA? Not the biggest hurdle, because this could still have been an enjoyable read if it had been about a man who travels back to live in a different time and gives insightful commentary on the similarities and differences between these cultures.

This book wasn't that, either. It was exactly what I had naively been trying not to read: a horror. Your basic stabby horror, with a slight twist. In this book, the immutability of the past, its obduracy to cling to what has already been, is the thing with teeth. I know that doesn't sound traditionally horrific, but its manifestation is that when the main character is trying to do something that would result in immediately changing the outcome of a big event--such as an event in which someone originally got killed--this aspect of the past intervenes repeatedly and violently to keep him from doing it.

Or all of those, and others. So the "dramatic" parts of the story involve our hero attempting to get to his destination and, for example, having to stop for green lights while traffic barrels through in the other direction, then having to go deal with his overwhelming diarrhea, then having to talk some completely random guy out of shooting him for a nonsense reason.

Then he has to deal with a topiary. A major part of the climax of the novel involves him trying to run up six flights of stairs having just broken a few ribs in a car crash, while also being a few weeks out of a coma. There's a killing of a family by sledgehammer-wielding maniac described in detail multiple times in the first pages.

Later on, a woman gets her cheek ripped open by a knife-wielding maniac. Multiple people kill themselves in front of our hero by slitting their throats. The structure of the novel is as follows: guy finds out he can easily go back in time to , to the same minute of the same day each time he goes. He becomes part of his friend's plot to keep Kennedy from being killed. Except the guy doesn't quite believe this whole time travel thing, so he goes back to , spends about 2 months hanging out and making observations about what various companies' slogans are always reproduced in all caps, so that it feels like they're being yelled from the page , stops a violent crime from happening close to home, and zips back to to confirm that, yes, he did change the past.

He returns to , re-stops that crime, and then spends the better part of five years waiting for Kennedy's assassination attempt. That's the middle of the book: him sitting around in the early s, in a holding pattern, scoping out downtown Dallas and following Lee Harvey Oswald from a distance so he can convince himself that he really doesn't like this guy. It takes at least pages for to arrive. The decision of what to do to Oswald is presented as simple and binary, in a way that bugged me throughout the book.

If our hero finds out that Oswald is the lone person behind the assassination, then the only course of action considered is for our guy to kill him. There's some momentary advance remorse about that, but not much, because Oswald is known to have killed Kennedy in the real timeline. The thing I still don't get is, in the real timeline, Oswald died as a direct result of having been arrested for Kennedy's murder.

Which means that a person who simply kept Oswald from being present on the parade route that day by any means necessary, gory ones included--slit the guy's arm open with a knife, for example would save both Kennedy's life and Oswald's. No murder necessary. King doesn't even give this idea lip service--killing is presented as the only possible plan in order to get the assassination stopped. Back to our hero. After he changes history, view spoiler [he finds out that human events are so important that if they get changed as significantly has he has altered them, the entire earth reacts.

Human events cause geological events. By stopping Kennedy's assassination, he initiates massive earthquakes, leading to lots of deaths and eventually to nuclear meltdowns years later. All of which means that instead of King doing the thing that people tend to find intriguing when reading alternate histories--giving his answer to "what really would have happened with Vietnam and Civil Rights and all that if Kennedy hadn't been shot?

So you spend pages wondering what King thinks this history would have looked like with more Kennedy in it, and King's writing itself is very workmanlike. He is rarely poetic or descriptive in ways that give any deeper meaning or even paint a vivid picture. This would be fine or something on the yawn-inducing side of fine if this were a fast, plot-driven book, but it's not. The engine of the book is the main character's time travel journey back from to and the years immediately following, but nothing that he ever says makes this feel like reality.

The narrator is supposed to be 35 in , which places him in my own age cohort--but I think even someone 10 or 20 years older than I am, given the time-travel option, would have a lot of strong visceral reactions to the way the world was back then. King has him comment on the fact that root beer tastes "fuller" from a soda fountain than it does in the present--but frankly, that doesn't give me much to go on, and he uses that same descriptor every time he references the root beer an awful lot without adding to the picture.

And that's it: he does nothing else to show how the experience of drinking at a soda fountain would be different from the experience that someone born in the late s would be used to at a diner in the 21st century. It's like this with so many things: either our hero doesn't seem to notice all the little differences in daily life, or he treats these with a nostalgia borrowed from the author. The representation of his age is wrong on other levels, too--the guy says he had never used a rotary phone before traveling to , even though many people from older generations like my grandparents and anyone else who could remember the Depression held on to their rotary phones until almost the s; and yet this same guy has a thorough and in-depth understanding of how to mess with records and record players to slow down playback.

His first time in , our hero buys what is apparently a cool s car and instantly falls in love with driving it, to the extent that he detests his Toyota Corolla with a passion when he gets back to The shift in his loyalties is instantaneous and unequivocal--no disorientation about the lack of seat belts or other now-familiar features in an older car, just a seamless love for all things vintage that feels too uncomplicated to be on-target. The cigarette smoke is another of this kind of example: our hero comments that smoke and smokers are everywhere, but then just seems able to ignore it.

It rings false that a non-smoker who finds himself in a place where every restaurant and bank has people smoking in it, and where every hotel room, used car, and cab reeks of cigarettes, wouldn't have a lot more adjusting to do than just the casual shrug that the guy gives when he mentions it.

It may sound weird that, given a book that's far too long, I'd be complaining about a lack of words, but it's more that the things King chooses to say often don't contribute to the storytelling or plotting or character development or setting and instead are meaningless, repetitive, and make the lack of significant detail all the more conspicuous by its absence.

While I was reading this book, my commuting audiobook was TC Boyle's Drop City, which is set in a hippie commune in The contrast between how Boyle gives a sense of and how King gives a sense of is vertiginous. Now for the -isms. After about pages of , it struck me that King was painting an idealistic, whitewashed picture of what was a turbulent and violent time with regard to civil rights. And right then, our hero said exactly the same thing in the narrative: "in case this seems like an overly happy picture, let me tell you about this 'colored' restroom I saw outdoors in North Carolina.

He goes on to describe a rest stop in which the regular bathroom is labeled for use by whites only and the signs to the 'colored' restroom lead to something awful. Completely reasonable and valid point made right there Anytime else in the book when he wants to talk about Civil Rights or unequal treatment or any of that, he references the bathroom in North Carolina. It doesn't seem to matter that the character drives from Florida to Texas across all of the most virulently racist states in the South during a time when race-related violence was peaking, then lives in Texas for another few years.

In all that time, he runs across a white man who says racist things and consequently decides he doesn't like the guy This character is walking around in the South living in segregated neighborhoods, eating at segregated lunch counters at which he always comments that the food is both good and cheap , drinking from segregated water fountains, riding buses where he gets to sit down when others have to stand in back because of their difference in skin color--and barely notices all of the casual racism entrenched in this world.

The fact that not only doesn't he notice this around him, but also that he has to reach way back to that one restroom in North Carolina whenever he needs to talk about discrimination, comes across as casually racist. Anti-Semitism: there are four characters in the book who are described explicitly as Jewish.

One of them is Jack Ruby, a real person who apparently owned a strip club King makes sure to point out and who was the guy who shot Oswald in the real timeline after he was in custody. The other three are fictional, all bookies.

They run pawn shops and have Mob ties and all make their money explicitly from the suffering of others. I could mention the two female family members we are introduced to as well, but they aren't characters--the narrative states explicitly at one point that they are interchangeable.

They also work in the family money businesses. I'd like to thank Stephen King personally for perpetuating stereotypes that just need to freaking die already. While we're at it, sexism: our hero is a guy who starts dating a woman in about , and he also spends a number of years teaching high school don't get me started on that--an English teacher from travels back 50 years and starts teaching adolescents seamlessly, without having any trouble adjusting to the loss of the most recent five decades of writing to teach from?

The loss of recognized diversity in curricula? How limited a teacher is he? He comments that they're expected to wear girdles sometimes, but he compares that to guys having to wear condoms and says that guys have it worse. Otherwise, he conveys no sense in the least that girls or women might have an easier time of things in than they do in I could say more about my dislike of this book.

I could mention my frustration with the way that King writes as though he knows nothing about what the Butterfly Effect actually references for the first pages--so that when he reveals that he mostly gets it, it's too little, too late. I could rant about many other aspects of the novel. Instead, I'll end by saying that there are books out there that accomplish what King is trying to do, using well-chosen words and fewer of them , thoughtful plots, and skilled character development.

For a time-travel study in contrasts, try Kindred , by Octavia Butler. For an experience of recent history that feels immersive and real , complete with sex, drugs, and rock'n'roll , try Drop City , by TC Boyle. View all 58 comments. Nov 19, David Putnam rated it really liked it. This one should've been five stars for me. I think what happened was that I loved the concept when I read about the book and had envisioned something more.

The story King wanted to write was all there and I truly enjoyed it. As always with King this is a great study in character and the evolution of the character. In this case using time as an added conflict that applies pressure on the character. King doesn't mess around with elaborate explanations on how or why the time travel works. It's just This one should've been five stars for me. It's just a simple closet in the diner that the character steps into and we're off and running.

I think this works mostly because we trust King so implicitly and that if he says it true it's true. For me a good book caused me to think about the story even when I was not reading. In this case, while still into the book, I researched the actual incident, the assassination, to see how far King veered historically. I found the topic so interesting I fell down the rabbit doing too much historical reading.

I like the book a great deal and recommend it. View all 20 comments. We were invited in. Therefore, because the dark surrounds us, let us turn our faces to the light. Let us endure hardship to be grateful for plenty. We have been given pain to be astounded by joy. We have been given life to deny death. We did not ask for this room or this music. But because we are here, let us dance. But first, he must create a life for himself in the years leading up to the assassination as he has some research to do.

In doing so, he stumbles upon the town of Jodie and a beautiful librarian named Sadie Dunhill. Let me preface this review by saying When I first read this book it blew me away, and on my reread, it had the exact same effect. I would go so far as to say that this is one of the best books I've ever read. Usually I can find faults within all of King's works, but I'm sitting here trying to think of something I didn't like about this book and I've got nothing.

On my first read I sometimes felt a bit bored by the JFK plot, but I think that was because I was so impatient to get back to Jake's life and relationship with Sadie. Now on my reread, I already knew what was coming - the same urgency wasn't there - so I was able to appreciate that storyline a bit more and it's actually really piqued an interest in learning more about this moment in American history.

King's writing is beautiful in this book. He evokes such a range of emotions in these pages, one minute I was laughing, the next I was crying. He makes me nostalgic for a time period and a country I didn't even live in! A root beer never ever appealed to me until I read this book.

His, or rather Jake's, reflections on life just really resonated with me, life CAN turn on a dime and this book is a constant reminder to just enjoy what you have when you have it - because who knows what is around the corner? I fell in love with Sadie as Jake did. Sadie is brave, headstrong, resilient, and given her past, her outlook on life is inspiring. As for Jake, some of the decisions he makes without giving away any spoilers proves that he is simply a good man.

To take on such an arduous task, spanning years of your life, is admirable. And with these two amazing characters, King writes his greatest love story. It is beautiful and heartfelt and REAL. It shook me to my core. If anyone ever tries to tell you that King can only write horror, slam this book in their face!

Although that's not to say that there aren't moments of horror Credit must also be given to the ridiculous amount of research that must have gone into this book. The attention to detail is staggering - I personally cannot say how much of it is accurate as I don't know much about the JFK assassination - but I'm guessing King left no stone unturned. I'm actually trying to convince my mum to read it as I think she'd love it, but she remains stubborn - I WILL break her!!

On a final note, I'm intrigued as to what King's initial ending was - he says in the afternotes that Joe came up with a better ending than the one he had planned. I wonder if it would have left me so dehydrated Does that make sense?

It does to me. Truly incredible. View all 18 comments. How did you do that? And is that a laptop melted onto a lawn mower? See there was this lightning strike and now I can use my time mower to visit the past and …. Wait a second. Oh, shit! What year are you from? My name is George Amberson. You too? Oh, man. That old chestnut? But are you sure you should be changing stuff in the past?

That seems really dangerous and could cause all kinds of paradoxes. Or worse yet, accidentally become your own grandfather. We did a few trial runs, and everything seemed OK. In fact, how do you time travel? I have a friend named Al who found a kind of portal in time. We call it the rabbit hole. Every time you go through it, you wind up at the same day in our home town in Al went through the rabbit hole over and over for years and discovered that no matter how long you stay, when you go back through the portal, only two minutes have elapsed since you left.

The person he saved was alive, but if he goes back through the portal to the past again, then everything resets to the original timeline and that person would die, unless Al saved them again, right? And you could go back to the past wearing that hat which resets everything, but when you went to the store you bought it from, the same hat would still be on your head and on the shelf at the same time!

Jake, are you sure about this? He worked it all out. Al is a baby boomer, right? A physicist? A historian? He owns the local diner. He came through and lived here several years while he watched Oswald. So he went back to and told me about the rabbit hole. I just realized that you had to live here for five years waiting for this moment. Damn, five years in the past must have sucked, Jake. You know, because of the reset.

I had to spend some time in a really nasty town in Maine called Derry. It was a very ugly place in They had some child murders. I started teaching again and built up a whole life for myself as George Amberson. I really like it here in the past now. But they have really good root beer in this time. And stuff is really cheap! I can buy a new car for peanuts.

Speaking of which, how did you make money? Just teaching? Like I made a pretty penny betting on the Dallas Texans to beat Houston the other night. It was very cool to bet on the Cowboys before they were even the Cowboys. The NFL started the Cowboys in Dallas just to screw with him, and he eventually had to move the team to Kansas City and change their name to the Chiefs. The Cowboys were always the Cowboys. Are you sure about that, Kemper? Jesus, you are scaring the shit out of me. I hope to hell you know a lot more about the JFK assassination than you do about pro football.

Did you at least bring some history books with you? You said that Al spent years getting ready for this? And each time hop only takes you two minutes, right? I really wish you would have thought this through more than just doing a couple of test runs. You should have done that like twenty times.

It would have taken you just forty minutes, right? You see, for one thing, the time we spent in the past is still elapsed time. The deeper you get into, the more you have to lose. You see, the past does not want to be changed. If you try to revise something, it fights back. When we did our trial runs, it threw everything it could at us from car trouble to illness, and the bigger the event, the harder it tries to stop you. And this seems like a good idea, Jake?

I did this with the best of intentions. I mean, you seem like a nice guy. Good luck you poor bastard. This was a big story in Dallas at the time and both teams did tons of promotions and advertising so it doesn't seem possible that Jake was somehow unaware of the existence of the Cowboys.

But the old Negro Leagues baseball team that had players like Satchel Paige was called the Monarchs, and you can still purchase Monarchs merchandise in KC today. Are they mistakes or is King just being cute? And that makes me nuts. When I heard the concept of this book, I worried that King was succumbing to a bad case of baby boomer JFKitis, and the early parts of the book seem to have confirmed this.

I was greatly relieved that by the end of this book, King seemed to have set aside the rose colored JFK glasses and made that oddity about the objects part of a paradox instead of just a plot contrivance. A Masterpiece! Awesome story!! Stephen blows my mind. His prose is so easy to follow and he is so clear what he is getting across to me, the reader. It knows how to set up a character. There are a lot of bells and whistles in this story and its draw is Lee Oswald and the shooting of JFK.

Yet, this story is really a love story. It's a beautiful relationship the A Masterpiece! It's a beautiful relationship the two have and the love story holds the whole book together, in my opinion. Jake goes back in time to stop the assassination of JFK. He lives in and he finds a strange time-hole that goes to and he has to live life in the past before he can stop Lee.

He moves to the Dallas area to a little town called Jodie, TX where he substitute teaches and becomes a full time staff. The librarian is Sadie Dunhill and they quickly become friends. Half of the story almost is their story and about the kids at school. Stephen is a master a character writing. If you want to know how to write a character, then Stephen is the master to follow. He uses that to build this community of Jodie and I was so pulled in.

I almost didn't care about the rest, but it's so intricately woven together that it's all one thread. As readers, especially someone like me who didn't know a whole lot about Oswald, Stephn has done his research and he packs this books with historical facts. He plays here and there with timing and he lets us know in the afterward, but mostly, he sticks to the facts.

I am amazed how much is known about the spouse abusing messed up man. King really brings the humanity to Marina, his wife and their child and he even shows the humanity of Lee at moments with his daughter. Marina put up with a horror show. The theme of this book is 'the past harmonizes' and Stephen drives this point home to good effect. It becomes it's own harmonic in the book and it helps to bring all the stories going on together.

I'm telling you, this is a layered masterpiece from one of the most gifted writers of our time. He weaves historical fact with fiction with historical fiction with time travel with a love story for the ages. The idea of time travel is also dealt with. What happens if time is changed? What would that do to the world? Would a good intention to change the past bring about the changes we want?

These are the questions explored in this book. The time travel is unique to what I've seen and I love it. In a dinner in the town Jake lives in, there is a "rabbit hole" and this particular hole leads to Everytime you go in, it's like a reset and anything you changed before is undone and it's always the exact same time you come out in.

It is a wonderful device Stephen came up with. Jake's friend hatches this plan to save JFK and Jake is the one who has to carry it out. It's fascinating and it makes you wonder if a "rabbit hole might be possible and how interesting to make that happen. It's a lovely device used in the story and all kinds of choices happen from it. You can go back and see the changes you made and then go back and tweek it.

This is now one of my Top 5 Favorite Stephen King novels. I really think it's a masterpiece and he is at the top of his game here. I wish I had read it sooner, but I got it now. Also, I got my tome in this year, barely. It also makes me wonder how many more masterpieces Stephen has in him. He seems to have one or more a decade. I guess 45 years of writing daily does pay off in a big way.

I also have a harmonic resonance with Stephen and his work. I was born in and he published Carrie in I find that interesting. I think my goal is to make a Stephen King year and I want to get caught up with his bibliography again. I will see if I can do a book a month or so. There are some big ones left to read so that might be asking too much. View all 27 comments. Apr 08, Gabby rated it it was amazing Shelves: 5-star-books , read-in , or-more-pages , adult , amazing-ending , forbidden-romance , classics , own , romance , has-a-movie.

We hav 4. View all 10 comments. Aug 08, Ahmad Sharabiani rated it really liked it Shelves: fiction , 21th-century , historical. Kennedy, which occurred on November 22, Epping gives an assignment to his adult students, asking them to write about a day that changed their lives. One of the students, a janitor named Harry Dunning, submits an assignment describing the night his alcoholic father murdered his mother and siblings with a hammer and injured Harry, causing him to have a permanent brain injury; the story emotionally affects Jake, and the two become friends after Harry earns his GED.

Two years later, in June , Jake stops by a local diner and speaks with the proprietor, Al, who asks Jake to meet him at his diner the next day. When Jake arrives, he is shocked to see that Al seems to have aged years since the previous day. Al explains that he is dying and that his appearance is attributable to his having time traveled and lived for years in the past.

Al's method of time travel is a time portal he discovered in his diner's pantry, which he used to transport himself to Feb 25, Felice Laverne rated it it was amazing Shelves: historical-fiction , full-review , thrillers. The premise in itself was exhilarating, and the execution was near flawless. This one was a novel that absolutely could not have been tackled by just anyone and may have fallen flat on its face if handled by a less experienced craftsman.

Even characters who were fleeting left their mark, shocking me, tickling me, and provoking thought along the way. The jargon that King used to color the various neighborhoods and scenes from Maine to Florida to Texas was deliciously realistic—he has a knack for that, and it was on full display here—and I felt that I was fully immersed in the world that he painted. This one gave me goosebumps in more than one place and food for thought in several others.

And, refreshingly, King resisted painting the 50s as a happy-go-lucky time of just sock-hops and poodle skirts and gave the 60s the gritty air that it deserved. He infused this glimpse at this time period with realistic strokes of segregation and poverty in his portrayal—truly showing us the world through King-colored glasses. From backwoods Maine lingo to deep Southern vernacular, the voices were masterfully done and the characters were all fully realized.

There are biblical references and historical facts—and distortions of them that allowed for his own creative riff on the past—Gothic elements galore and grit. True, unflinching blood-and-dirt-in-your-nails grit. This one came full circle in various parts of the novel, not just in the end in that formulaic way that we are all oh-so-familiar with, showing how all of the pieces connected hand-in-hand to tell one larger story.

Quite the narrative tool for building suspense and tension. But the sheer gravity of this novel and unimpeachable hand that resonated through to the very last page overrode those small annoyances. View all 23 comments. I had just sat down to begin this review on my laptop when the doorbell went. I wasn't expecting anyone. It was probably going to be one of those pitiful door to door salesmen trying to get me to buy a dishcloth for a fiver. They make me feel so bad.

But it wasn't. I opened the door and looked at myself. It was me. I'm you. Sorry about that. Like looking in a mirror, isn't it? But worse! So I went inside. I made myself a cup of tea and one for me too. We sat down at the table and regarded each other with frank horror. Are you a clone? I'm from the future.

It's that one there — " I gestured to the fat wedge on the table between us. The one you were going to. You have to change it. How do you know what I was going to write, anyway, I haven't written it yet? Come on, the guy in this book is a lot quicker on the uptake than this.

I haven't got all day. You'd already worked up a few choice phrases, along the lines of So he goes back in time to and he's living through these years waiting to get to the assassination bit and that's where the story becomes this I-Love-The-Lates-Stroke-Early-Sixties loveletter from Stephen King to his own childhood. The boring teacher gets to meet a girl and fall in lurve, sweet sweet lurve.

That's not a spoiler, it's in the blurb, sweet sweet blurb. He gets to live in The perfect Small Town. He gets to Affect Kids' Lives. He gets to blurt out anachronistic slang and have people look at him funny! He gets to wince at casual racism! It's all good. But not for me. I wanted to get back to Oswald.

I paid my damn ticket, and I wanted to see some Oswald. But for pages it may as well have. But Oswald's the one that I want. Oooh ooh ooh. I was amazed — that was exactly what I was going to write. You can't deny it. I know you were because you did it, that's to say I did it, and I'm here now to stop myself from doing it. I got the idea of looking for a portal when I read this book. Why didn't you do something more useful than that?

And I found somebody's lost cat for them. And now you — you're the last on my list. Stephen King goes on and on and on about it. Because of that. Sorry about that, I gave myself away there. It can be confusing getting all this straight in your head when you're from the future.

Got any aspirin? Anyway, your nasty review gets to be unaccountably popular on Goodreads. I've been getting kind of middling results for months. You're only as good as your last review, you know. It's a vicious world. No compassion. So that made it okay.

After your review things… happen. If your review persuades just one single person not to buy the book, then that's probably why in three weeks' time Japan splits in half and most people have got acne in the world of three weeks from now. The future is important, it must be preserved. Hosts of butterflies are always in the air, waiting to fly around like crazy ass future-changing bastards. This will be awkward.

Isn't there any place for me to hide? You could try to hide behind the settee but you'll have to shove it out from the wall, and she'll notice I think. She came into the room and surveyed the both of us. He's me but he's from the future. I need you to pick up Georgia from school, she had a rehearsal for the play so I couldn't do it, and can you pointing at the future me nip to Sainsbury's and get me a few things? I need you to be quick, I'm in a mad rush. I've got that thing tonight, remember?

I looked at me. Now we're doing Multiplicity. That was quite good. Yes, well, I suppose this once. But look — you have to give Remember Japan and acne. View all 40 comments. Meeting up with Al one evening, Jake is stunned by the astonishing secret Al has kept for several years.

Not any ordinary journey, but an extraordinary and quite unique mission that he needs to take at once. For the most part the story moves along at a gentle speed, no rushing, no fast action, just an easy going way of telling a profound heartfelt tale. However, when you least expect it the story line takes an abrupt turn with nail biting, breath-taking moments.

Highly recommended to all readers. March 18th, I've thought about this book off and on the last few months since I read it. I've changed my mind and rating. That's the power of a great book! February 8th, I went into this book knowing three things: 1. It was HUGE 2. First , I can safel March 18th, I've thought about this book off and on the last few months since I read it. What a bastard. Not only with killing Kennedy but in his marriage as well.

The characters in Jodie, Texas made this book for me. He gave the teenagers heart along with the teachers and the whole community. I loved every bit of it. Stephen King really nailed the baby-boom area. I could see it in my mind as I was listening to this audio book.

At the beginning, the narrator Craig Wasson would change voices to fit the character. He did it all from Texas and Russian accents, along with the annoying old woman. Well done sir! Hahaha I loved Jake Epping. He was a complex and well-loved hero.

He made this book for me. I would have been greedy, and gambling much more than he did in the book! I also would have been a bit more bloodthirsty. Hey, I'm not going to lie. I highly recommend this book. Seriously, you won't regret reading this. The story along with the characters will make you love, laugh and hate with a vengeance. I was crying at the end and the tension had me on the edge of my seat. THIS is great writing and storytelling. Well done King! Oh yeah, one last thing.

This damn word drove me nuts by the end. Use syllables next time King! View all 28 comments. Oct 01, Lyn rated it really liked it. An excellent Stephen King novel. What had gotten his goat was that Stephen King was wallowing in C-notes the way a hog wades in mud. King takes the Mark Twain A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court time machine idea of a strange occurrence that is never thoroughly explained or understood.

But this is Stephen King after all and he mixes in some mysterious elements to keep the story moving. King allows for an unusual magical setting rule: the traveler goes back to the same date every time, in September And so the plan is hatched to go back to save Kennedy. It then stands to reason that our intrepid time traveler will spend five years in the past waiting for his rendezvous with destiny.

King uses this word over a dozen times in the book to describe how the past does not want to change and makes it difficult for our hero to save the day. This kind of unleveling of the playing field is first rate King and his almost personification of time is one of the elements of this story that makes it so appealing. King, in much the same way that Steven Spielberg does in film, finds the horrific and exciting in the ordinary.

The monster is not just under the bed or in the closet, but in the laundry room, and buried inside a stack of old magazines — or in a pantry in a greasy spoon diner. Hell yeah, elitist literary types, pay attention and you might learn something. At the end of the day, this is a very good book — a great story told by a master storyteller.

View all 32 comments. So much fun!!! Although fictional, King skillfully weaves together fact and fiction and he did an incredible amount of research as explained in his Afterword and much of this story is based on fact. It sparked an interest for Lindsay that will surely lead her to read other books on this topic. We found that the action picks up right away as we quickly learn the details of the time traveling aspect of this novel and how most of the time traveling worked.

The time traveling was kept fairly simple and understandable. The story takes on a human side of it through the romance and the lives of the characters which takes up a lot of the middle of the book. Showing us a pleasant, ordinary, and somewhat boring life for a bit of the story. We loved the romance that transpired within this story as it was a pleasant distraction from some of the political history, especially the Russian political history, that we all struggled with.

We like how King gave a story to angry, violent, and disturbed Lee Oswald giving us some interesting insight into his and his family's lives. The story sagged and really dragged for us at times and we felt that a lot of unnecessary details could've been sliced and diced a bit and still tell a strong story. Unfortunately, this did take a bit away from the story and was a bit discouraging. The chapters being broken done in sections did help getting through the length of this weight lifting book.

Jake was a very anchored character to reality and loved his desire and determination to change the future not only for his world but for all of mankind. We LOVED good hearted and wounded Jake and Sadie and their tender relationship that had us rooting for them throughout the entire book.

We were completely caught off guard that this turned out to be somewhat of a love story — not what we were expecting at all and we absolutely loved that part of the novel. Toward the end, we all kept looking for a twist that never came and felt that while we enjoyed the story, the book didn't quite live up to the hype we had expected.

View all 73 comments. What a great read! My favorite book of the year thus far. Highly recommend! Occam's Razor - the simplest explanation is usually the right one. Update: June 4, - Wow! Enjoyed a marathon day of all 8 epis WOW!

Enjoyed a marathon day of all 8 episodes of Season 1. Action Packed! Don't Miss It! View all 49 comments. May 31, Sarah rated it it was amazing Shelves: non-fiction , science-fiction , historical , favorites , fiction , thriller. This book is one of the best I have read in awhile for its length.